Itivuttaka | This was said by the Buddha

A collection of 112 short discourses, it takes its name from the statement at the beginning of each of its discourses: this (iti) was said (vuttaṁ) by the Blessed One. The collection as a whole is attributed to a laywoman named Khujjuttarā, who worked in the palace of King Udena of Kosambī as a servant to one of his queens, Sāmāvati. Because the Queen could not leave the palace to hear the Buddha’s discourses, Khujjuttarā went in her place, memorized what the Buddha said, and then returned to the palace to teach the Queen and her 500 ladies-in-waiting. For her efforts, the Buddha cited Khujjuttarā as the foremost of his laywomen disciples in terms of her learning. She was also an effective teacher: when the inner apartments of the palace later burned down, killing the Queen and her entourage, the Buddha commented (in Udāna 7:10) that all of the women had reached at least the first stage of awakening.

  • Introduction
  • The Group of Ones

    • Iti 1  —  Abandon greed, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 2  —  Abandon aversion, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 3  —  Abandon delusion, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 4  —  Abandon anger, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 5  —  Abandon contempt, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 6  —  Abandon conceit, and you’re guaranteed non-return.
    • Iti 7  —  When the mind, cleansed of passion for the All, abandons it, you are capable of putting an end to stress.
    • Iti 8  —  When the mind, cleansed of passion for conceit, abandons it, you are capable of putting an end to stress.
    • Iti 9  —  When the mind, cleansed of passion for greed, abandons it, you are capable of putting an end to stress.
    • Iti 10—13  —  When the mind, cleansed of passion for aversion… delusion… anger… contempt, abandons it, you are capable of putting an end to stress.
    • Iti 14  —  Hindered by the hindrance of ignorance, people go wandering and transmigrating on for a long, long time.
    • Iti 15  —  Fettered with the fetter of craving, beings go wandering and transmigrating on for a long, long time.
    • Iti 16  —  Appropriate attention as the prime internal factor to help those in training.
    • Iti 17  —  Friendship with admirable people as the prime external factor to help those in training.
    • Iti 18  —  Schism in the Sangha leads to the detriment and unhappiness of many beings, both human and divine.
    • Iti 19  —  Concord in the Sangha leads to the welfare and happiness of many beings, both human and divine.
    • Iti 20  —  Corrupt-mindedness leads to rebirth in the planes of deprivation.
    • Iti 21  —  Clear-mindedness leads to rebirth in a heavenly world.
    • Iti 22  —  “Acts of merit” is a synonym for what is blissful, desirable, pleasing, endearing, charming. The Buddha recalls the results he himself has experienced from doing meritorious deeds.
    • Iti 23  —  Heedfulness with regard to skillful qualities keeps both kinds of benefit secure: benefit in this live and benefit in lives to come.
    • Iti 24  —  In this course of transmigrating, one person would leave behind a heap of bones as large as a mountain—if there were someone to collect the bones and the collection were not destroyed.
    • Iti 25  —  A person who tells a deliberate lie is capable of any evil deed.
    • Iti 26  —  If you knew, as the Buddha did, the results of giving and sharing, you wouldn’t eat without having shared.
    • Iti 27  —  Goodwill far outshines all other ways of making merit.

    The Group of Twos

    • Iti 28  —  Not guarding the doors of the sense faculties and knowing no moderation in food leads to suffering in this life and the next.
    • Iti 29  —  Guarding the doors of the sense faculties and knowing moderation in food leads to ease in this life and the next.
    • Iti 30  —  Two things that cause remorse.
    • Iti 31  —  Two things that cause lack of remorse.
    • Iti 32  —  A person of evil habits and evil views is as if in hell in this lifetime.
    • Iti 33  —  A person of auspicious habits and auspicious views is as if in heaven in this lifetime.
    • Iti 34  —  To lack ardency and compunction makes you incapable of unbinding.
    • Iti 35  —  The holy life is lived for the purpose of restraint and abandoning.
    • Iti 36  —  The holy life is lived for the purpose of direct knowledge and full comprehension.
    • Iti 37  —  A sense of urgency and appropriate exertion bring ease here-and-now, and lead to the ending of the effluents.
    • Iti 38  —  Two thoughts that often occur to the Buddha as he delights in non-ill will and seclusion.
    • Iti 39  —  Two Dhamma sequences: see evil as evil, and become released from it.
    • Iti 40  —  Ignorance leads to lack of shame and compunction.
    • Iti 41  —  The rewards of noble discernment.
    • Iti 42  —  Shame and compunction safeguard the world.
    • Iti 43  —  The existence of an unfabricated dimension allows for the escape from fabrication.
    • Iti 44  —  Two unbinding properties: with fuel remaining and with no fuel remaining.
    • Iti 45  —  Live enjoying aloofness, delighting in aloofness, inwardly committed to awareness-tranquility, not neglecting jhāna, endowed with clear-seeing insight, and frequenting empty buildings.
    • Iti 46  —  Live with the trainings as your reward, with discernment uppermost, with release the essence, and with mindfulness the governing principle.
    • Iti 47  —  Be wakeful, mindful, alert, centered, sensitive, clear, and calm. And there you should, at the appropriate times, see clearly into skillful mental qualities.
    • Iti 48  —  Two types of behavior that lead to hell.
    • Iti 49  —  How those with vision differ from those who adhere to craving for becoming and those who slip past into craving for non-becoming.

    The Group of Threes

    • Iti 50  —  Three roots of what is unskillful.
    • Iti 51  —  Three properties: form, formlessness, cessation.
    • Iti 52  —  Three feelings.
    • Iti 53  —  How the three types of feeling should be viewed.
    • Iti 54  —  Three searches: for sensuality, for becoming, for a holy life.
    • Iti 55  —  Three searches: for sensuality, for becoming, for a holy life.
    • Iti 56  —  Three effluents.
    • Iti 57  —  Three effluents.
    • Iti 58  —  Three cravings.
    • Iti 59  —  Three qualities that lead beyond Māra’s domain.
    • Iti 60  —  Three grounds for meritorious activity.
    • Iti 61  —  Three eyes: the eye of flesh, the divine eye, and the eye of discernment.
    • Iti 62  —  The noble attainments described in terms of three faculties.
    • Iti 63  —  Three time periods and the importance of comprehending signs.
    • Iti 64  —  Three kinds of misconduct.
    • Iti 65  —  Three kinds of good conduct.
    • Iti 66  —  Three kinds of cleanliness: bodily, verbal, and mental.
    • Iti 67  —  Three forms of sagacity: bodily, verbal, and mental.
    • Iti 68  —  One whose passion, aversion, and delusion are abandoned is freed from Māra’s power.
    • Iti 69  —  To abandon passion, aversion, and delusion is like crossing over the dangers of the ocean.
    • Iti 70  —  The Buddha reports having seen, for himself, beings reborn in planes of deprivation in line with their wrong views and evil actions.
    • Iti 71  —  The Buddha reports having seen, for himself, beings reborn in good destinations in line with their right views and good actions.
    • Iti 72  —  Three properties for escape: from sensuality, from form, and from whatever is fabricated and dependently co-arisen.
    • Iti 73  —  Formless phenomena are more peaceful than forms; cessation, more peaceful than formless phenomena.
    • Iti 74  —  Three types of sons and daughters (when compared to their parents): of heightened birth, of similar birth, and of lowered birth.
    • Iti 75  —  Three types of people: one like a cloud without rain, one who rains locally, and one who rains everywhere.
    • Iti 76  —  Aspiring to three forms of bliss, wise people should guard their virtue.
    • Iti 77  —  This body falls apart; consciousness is subject to fading; all acquisitions are inconstant, stressful, subject to change.
    • Iti 78  —  Like attracts like. It’s in accordance with their properties—either low or admirable—that beings come together and associate with one another.
    • Iti 79  —  Three things lead to the falling away of a monk in training.
    • Iti 80  —  Three kinds of unskillful thinking.
    • Iti 81  —  The dangers of letting your mind be overcome by the fact that you either receive offerings or don’t receive offerings.
    • Iti 82  —  Three occasions on which devas give voice to joy over the behavior of human beings.
    • Iti 83  —  Five omens that appear when a deva is about to pass away, and the encouragement that other devas give at that time.
    • Iti 84  —  Three people who appear for the benefit of the world.
    • Iti 85  —  The rewards of focusing on the foulness of the body, of establishing mindfulness of breathing to the fore, and of focusing on the inconstancy of all fabrications.
    • Iti 86  —  Practicing the Dhamma in accordance with the Dhamma.
    • Iti 87  —  Three kinds of unskillful thinking; three kinds of skillful thinking.
    • Iti 88  —  Three inside stains.
    • Iti 89  —  Conquered by three forms of false Dhamma, Devadatta was incurably doomed to deprivation.
    • Iti 90  —  Three supreme objects of confidence: the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Saṅgha.
    • Iti 91  —  Why reasonable people take up the life of alms-going, and the dangers that lie in wait if they do not train their minds.
    • Iti 92  —  To see the Dhamma is to see the Buddha and to be close to him, even when physically far away.
    • Iti 93  —  The three fires: of passion, aversion, and delusion.
    • Iti 94  —  On having consciousness neither externally scattered and diffused, nor internally positioned.
    • Iti 95  —  Three ways in which devas obtain sensual pleasures.
    • Iti 96  —  The yoke of sensuality and the yoke of becoming.
    • Iti 97  —  Admirable virtue, admirable qualities, and admirable discernment defined.
    • Iti 98  —  Two kinds of gifts, sharing, and assistance: in material things and in Dhamma.
    • Iti 99  —  The three knowledges that characterize a brahman in the Buddha’s sense of the word.

    The Group of Fours

    • Iti 100  —  The Buddha as doctor; the monks as his heirs in Dhamma, not in material things.
    • Iti 101  —  The four basic requisites are easy to gain and blameless. To be content with them is a factor of the contemplative life.
    • Iti 102  —  For one knowing and seeing the four noble truths, there is the ending of stress (dukkha).
    • Iti 103  —  To see the four noble truths is to count as a true contemplative.
    • Iti 104  —  The rewards of associating with those who genuinely count as admirable friends.
    • Iti 105  —  Where a monk’s craving takes birth.
    • Iti 106  —  Mother and father as the Brahmās and first teachers of their children.
    • Iti 107  —  The reciprocal ways in which monks and lay supporters benefit one another.
    • Iti 108  —  Monks who are and who are not the Buddha’s true followers.
    • Iti 109  —  An extended metaphor for the dangers of “going with the flow.”
    • Iti 110  —  What it means to have ardency and compunction.
    • Iti 111  —  When one is consummate in virtue, what more is to be done?
    • Iti 112  —  The qualities that entitle the Buddha to be called Tathāgata.